Author Archives: Jenn Sheppard

About Jenn Sheppard

Moto/Photo/Journalist. '10 M.A. - Magazine, Newspaper and Online Journalism, Syracuse University. Off-road racer. '10-14 Florida Trail Riders Magazine Editor/Publisher

Writing 101: Unlock the Mind

You write because you have an idea in your mind that feels so genuine, so important, so true. And yet, by the time this idea passes through the different filters of your mind, and into your hand, and onto the page or computer screen — it becomes distorted, and it’s been diminished. The writing you end up with is an approximation, if you’re lucky, of whatever it was you really wanted to say.

Author Khaled Hosseini, “How to Write,” the Atlantic

 

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American elite colleges: In a state of ‘complete failure’?

Jenn Sheppard:

Interesting…”if you look at someone who went to Princeton, someone who got into Princeton but didn’t go, and even someone who just applied to Princeton, they end up making the same amount of money because what matters is the kid, not the school. I just wish more people knew that. Still, there’s no question that in terms of prestige and access, going to the best school matters.

Originally posted on Fortune:

It’s rare that academics stir up this much excitement.

Former Yale English professor William Deresiewicz kicked up an awful lot of hullabaloo earlier this year when an article he had written went viral. Its title will help explain: “Don’t send your kids to the Ivy League: The nation’s top colleges are turning our kids into zombies.”

In the article, which was published by The New Republic this summer, Deresiewicz characterized Ivy League students as competitive hoop jumpers who—as adolescents—had been so programmed to try to meet the sky-high requirements of top-tier institutions that once they were admitted and arrived, they simply sought out the next hurdles to clear. They gave more thought to padding their resumes than choosing their coursework and wound up on a conveyor belt into careers on Wall Street or in consultancy.

In his recently published book Excellent Sheep: The Miseducation of the American Elite and The…

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In threes

I’m teaching my Journalism students how to structure a news story by utilizing the Rule of Three. Bad (or good) things happen in threes. Why, they want to know? That’s just how it is, I tell them.

The Rule of Three is a writing principle that suggests that things that come in threes are inherently funnier, more satisfying, or more effective than other numbers of things.

To prove my point, I’ve had three bad things happen to me recently. The first was hurting my hand in my race three weeks ago. It still hurts! The second was my kickstarter breaking off before my next race in South Carolina. I drove all the way there (and had my suspension serviced the Friday before) for nothing! [Note: Not really nothing. I put on my journalist hat and started taking pictures, instead.] 

My teammate #9 where I should be starting next to her!

My teammate #9 where I should be starting next to her!

Someone actually snapped a photo of me taking pictures! (Mariah Lacy Photo)

Someone actually snapped a photo of me taking pictures! (Mariah Lacy Photo)

The third bad thing was throwing my back out while sneezing last week! I could literally not believe this one…but if you’ve ever seen or heard my mother sneeze, you feel my pain. Just one powerful sneeze sent me screaming to the floor where I remained with my dog licking my face.

It’s been a week since the last bad thing happened, so I’m assuming I’m good for a while. I’m looking forward to racing this weekend in Gainesville if my hand can handle it, of course. I would hate to enter a race that I know I couldn’t win.

I’m also looking forward to three good things happening since my friend Deborah and I decided to start our own race team, and we already have a name! We’re planning to hit most, if not all, of the out-of-state National Enduros next season, which could take us anywhere from Colorado to Missouri. Stay tuned…

9 tips to land your dream job

Jenn Sheppard:

Since the fall semester started last week, I’m reminded why teaching is my dream job, however sitting around in my pajamas all day working on the computer was nice this summer.
I’m happy to be back in front of my students who make each day interesting just by showing up to my classes.

Originally posted on Fortune:

Ah, the dream job. Just as work has been reshaped by technology and globalization, so too have our professional fantasies. While jobs atop the corporate ladder haven’t totally lost their luster, more and more Americans are seeking work-life balance. And now that leaner, recession-tested firms are hiring again, they’re looking for something different too. Given the new landscape, we asked a few ­experts—­career coaches, headhunters, and recruiters—to weigh in with their best, most relevant tips for today. The old rules still ­apply—network, network, network!—but here’s the latest on how to land that ideal job, whatever it may be.

1. Define what you want
JOB.1[3]Before you network, and certainly before you step into an interview, know your goals and what you’re dreaming to do. That sounds like a no-brainer, but our experts say the No. 1 mistake job seekers make is not being able to articulate what kind of job they…

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Ultimate highs and lows

Seat bouncing of some sort...

Seat bouncing of some sort…

I lead my race yesterday from just after the start to a few miles after turning the third lap when I crashed for the first and only time in more than 35 miles and injured my left hand. In all, I averaged 19.9 mph and 188 bpm – my heart rate peaked at 201 after the 1-hour mark.

Check out the details, here: Hare Scrambles #1 by no1jenn at Garmin Connect

Trying to keep up behind #311A.

Trying to keep up behind #311A.

Highs and lows

I lead my race yesterday from just after the start to a few miles after turning the third lap when I crashed for the first and only time in more than 35 miles and injured my left hand. In all, I averaged 19.9 mph and 188 bpm – my heart rate peaked at 201 after the 1-hour mark.

“there is a tendency for people who are more spiritually focused to ignore, avoid, or dismiss their bodies. Similarly, many individuals are entirely ensconced in the carnal realm and pay no attention to the needs of the soul.”